With Citizens’ Help, Cities Can Build A Better Bike Lane — And More

With Citizens’ Help, Cities Can Build A Better Bike Lane — And More

As Burlington and other cities adopt the scrappy tactics of their citizens, they’ll need to show that they can make good on tactical urbanism’s original principles — to move faster, try new things, and not be afraid to fail.

Tactical urbanism. So it has a name.

From Laurel Wamsley/NPR.

Bike Taxes: The Debate

Should bicyclists pay taxes on their bikes to help pay for bicycle-specific infrastructure?

Chicago is by no means the only place across the U.S. tempted to see bicyclists as a possible new source of revenue, only to run into questions of fairness and enforceability. That is testing the vision of city leaders who are transforming urban expanses with bike lanes and other amenities in a quest for relevance, vitality and livability — with never enough funds.

I think it’s only fair. Plus a $25 annual cycling tax is reasonable compared to what motorists pay. Besides, it would also help end the debate. Though once a tax is in place, it would be probably be easier to raise it then end it.

[photo via Payton Chung/flickr]

Sen. Barbara Boxer Protects Bike, Pedestrian, And Public Transportation Funding

Sen. Barbara Boxer

Dear Sen. Barbara Boxer,

Thank you for fighting for bicyclists, pedestrians, and public transportation users in the latest Federal Transportation Bill.

I do not support Sen. Tom Coburn‘s efforts to strip funding for projects such as bike paths or sidewalks.

Please keep up the good fight.

Sincerely,

PJ

P.S. If other people get a chance, please say thanks to Sen. Boxer (courtesy of TransForm).

[photo via Los Angeles Times]

Ecology Center’s “Refuel, Repair, Reimagine: A Series About The Future Of Bay Area Transportation”

Traffic/Congestion

For this month of September, the Ecology Center is sponsoring a free series of events, “Refuel, Repair, Reimagine: A Series About The Future Of Bay Area Transportation”, to educate and enlighten residents about how to retrofit the current transportation systems to fit the needs of a sustainable future.

It all starts on Thursday, 8 September 2011 (7-9PM PST) with “From Auto-Cities to EcoCities: Examples from Around the Globe” that will include a slideshow and discussion with Kirsten Miller and Richard Register on EcoCities.

Other events include:

Thursday, 15 September (7-9PM PST)Post-Petroleum Transportation: Finding Your Best Alternative Fuel

Saturday, 17 September (10AM-NOON PST)Kids And Family Bike Workshop[1. FREE; but space is limited, pre-registration required.]

Wednesday, 21 September (6:30-8:30PM PST)The Confident Bike Commuter: Fixing Flats & DIY Maintenance

Thursday, 22 September (7-9PM PST)Smart Growth and Just Growth: The Quest For Equity In Transit-Oriented Development

The event will feature a panel (Catalina Garzon, Program Co-Director, Pacific Institute; Joel Ramos, Planner, TransForm; Bob Allen, Director of Transportation Justice, Urban Habitat; Evelyn Stivers, Field Director, Non-Profit Housing Association Of Northern CA; Margaret Gordon, Co-Founder, West Oakland Environmental Indicators Project, Ditching Dirty Diesel Collaborative) that will discuss transit-oriented development and its implications on the Bay Area.

Saturday, 24 September (starts at 9AM PST)Moving Planet Mobilization: Berkeley Bike Ride, BART Gathering, and SF Parade

This event will feature three separate activities in celebration of Moving Planet, “a worldwide rally to demand solutions to the climate crisis.”

Please Note: All events will take place at the Ecology Center located at 2530 San Pablo Avenue, Berkeley; except for the Kids and Family Bike Workshop (EcoHouse at 1305 Hopkins Street, Berkeley) and Moving Planet Mobilization (Ashby BART).

Repair, Refuel, Reimagine  -Ecology Center

[photo via Curious Orange | image via Ecology Center]