Why Does The U.S. Have Bad Public Transit? Blame Class Warfare.

Why Does The U.S. Have Bad Public Transit? Blame Class Warfare.

What this all adds up to is workers who are less desperate and who have more options; which equals workers with more bargaining power; which equals more inconveniences and higher labor costs for the business owners, managers, and other professionals who make up much of the Republican base.

Good points, but too general an argument without digging deeper on specific transit systems (especially those that work well–i.e., Bay Area Rapid Transit).

[photo credit: tokyoform/flickr]

In Praise Of The Land Value Tax

 

In Praise Of The Land Value Tax

Jeff Spross‘ argument on a land value tax (LVT) as a means for local governments to raise additional revenues.

The cool thing about an LVT is it really reveals how an economy is really an ecology. Everything is interconnected, no man is an island, and no single act of productivity can truly be carved out from the cooperative whole. No one can create more land and no can make land itself intrinsically better, so when the value of land rises, that is literally an ecological phenomenon. In truth, a sizeable portion of the wealth our economy creates really does belong to no one and everyone at the same time.

[photo via Mike Mozart]

How A Giant Manhattan Building Learned To Stop Murdering Birds

From Amy Kraft (The Week, 9 April 2015), renovations designed to make the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City a better building and habitat led to a significant decrease in direct bird collisions and deaths.

As far as bird deaths go, [Dr. Susan] Elbin, [NYC Audubon’s director of conservation and science], said that her data shows a 90 percent decrease in collisions with the Javits Center as a result of the renovations.

How A Giant Manhattan Building Learned To Stop Murdering Birds

Density Yields Few Benefits If Sprawl Still Occurs

Aside from Quartz’s very misleading title, a recent study concluded that if cities increased density into their urban cores, there would still be few benefits to air quality if sprawl isn’t reduced as well.

Boston University study published on April 6 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that a major push in cities like Denver to build dense housing, better transit systems, and more bike lanes in their urban core doesn’t necessarily lead to lower per-capita CO2 emissions. That’s because suburbs continue to sprawl and residents there still drive to work.

Mass transit isn’t necessarily the answer to lower carbon emissions

The Urban Neighborhood Wal-Mart: A Blessing Or A Curse?

NPR‘s first of two-part series about Wal-Mart looks into the company’s push into cities with its neighborhood market stores whether or not local residents want them. Citing the need to fill the void of food deserts, Wal-Mart is aggressively courting grocery shoppers.

Most urban stores are 25 percent of the size of their rural and suburban cousins. They feature a slightly modified selection of products that caters more to a grab-and-go culture. That reflects a shift in consumer demand, as more Americans make their evening meal decisions in the late afternoon, says food industry analyst Justin Massa.

The Urban Neighborhood Wal-Mart: A Blessing Or A Curse?

[photo via Mike Mozart/flickr]