How We’re Over-Hyping America’s Urban Comeback

Fool For The City: How We’re Over-Hyping America’s Urban Comeback

Jacob Anbinder’s (The Week) conclusion:

Because for all the hype about America’s urban comeback, it’s clear that the comeback isn’t happening everywhere. It’s a complicated equation that determines where job growth occurs. And much of it remains unsolved.

And that’s the rub…

Has The Farmers Market Movement Peaked?

Penn Quarter Farmers Market (Washington, D.C.)

Has the farmers market movement peaked? (from Russ Parsons of the Los Angeles Times)

An excerpt:

A new study by the Department of Agriculture finds that the rate of growth in the number of farmers markets nationally has slowed dramatically in the last five years.

That decline was particularly notable in Los Angeles County, historically on the leading edge of the farmers market movement, where according to USDA statistics, total sales dropped by almost 43% in real dollars between 2007 and 2012.

[photo via ep_jhu/flickr]

Bike Taxes: The Debate

Should bicyclists pay taxes on their bikes to help pay for bicycle-specific infrastructure?

Chicago is by no means the only place across the U.S. tempted to see bicyclists as a possible new source of revenue, only to run into questions of fairness and enforceability. That is testing the vision of city leaders who are transforming urban expanses with bike lanes and other amenities in a quest for relevance, vitality and livability — with never enough funds.

I think it’s only fair. Plus a $25 annual cycling tax is reasonable compared to what motorists pay. Besides, it would also help end the debate. Though once a tax is in place, it would be probably be easier to raise it then end it.

[photo via Payton Chung/flickr]